iBARGE 2017!

The iBARGE program is ramping up for sampling in summer 2017, with a few exciting additions to our program. First of all, we will be expanding into the southeastern US, which will give us sites in almost every state along the Atlantic Ocean and will allow us to examine temperature-dependent patterns over a large scale….

Crab and Snail Project

Will snails be able to defend themselves from predators like crabs in future ocean conditions? Ocean acidification makes it harder for many marine animals to produce shells, which are what they use for defense from predators. I am working on a fun project related to this at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. You can…

New iBARGE Scientific Publications!

Three recent scientific journal articles have been published using data collected by all involved students and teachers in the iBARGE program! One described the experimental collaboration process from the perspective of the scientists (Josh Lord and Brielle Dalvano), the teachers (Gian Grant), and two of the high school students (Diana Palma, Nicholas Negrete) and was…

Photos from 2015 sites

The folks who participated in the iBARGE program in 2015 took and uploaded over 1000 photos of fouling communities all over the world, from the US, Canada, UK, Spain, and New Zealand. There are quite a few similarities in species between sites, as a few species were found at almost every site! I’ve posted representative…

iBARGE Expansion Summer 2015

I have┬áreceived funding to expand the iBARGE program to up to 50 sites (from 9) for summer 2015. A student research assistant and I are currently recruiting volunteers at sites in 7+ countries around the world that share the same pool of invasive species. We urge any students or teachers who would like to be…

Last Summer Photos from Maine, USA

With summer programs ending, the iBARGE branch in Harpswell, Maine, USA, sent in their final photos of the summer. Late recruitment this year because of a cold winter, but by the end of the summer, many species of hydroids, tunicates, and bryozoans covered panels like the one below.